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» One Touch Football - Archive » Books » Has anyone picked up a single novel during the World Cup? (Page 3)

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Author Topic: Has anyone picked up a single novel during the World Cup?
Mat Pereira
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I've been reading 'Mansfield Park' by Jane Austen and am pretty near the end of it. It's really good.

Also that 'Brilliant Orange' book about Dutch football, which was okay, but kind of frustrating in that the only person not interviewed - Cruyff - was pretty much the central focus of the book and as such there was a big hole at the heart of the book.

It wasn't a novel though, obviously.

Oh, Mansfield Park isn't set in Mansfield, but somewhere just outside Northampton. Just in case you were wondering.

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Gangster Octopus
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quote:
Oh, Mansfield Park isn't set in Mansfield, but somewhere just outside Northampton.
Otherwise it'd've been called Scabs and Scabability...
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Reed
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GFB, I think "ace" should be used to describe things that are pleasant like a Rivaldo bicycle kick, a tasty pie, or a motorbike. Wittgenstein is more like brocolli or a visit to the dentists. Something you should do, and you feel much better after you've done it, but it isn't much fun.
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Croute au fromage et oeuf au plat
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Post Officy by Bukowski. Brilliant book, especially for a nihilist ex-postal clerk like me...
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The Purple Cow
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Diamond Broon, Snow Crash is very different from Cryptonomicon, other than that they are both great books.

Snow Crash is hard-core cyberpunk. If you like Richard Kadrey and/or William Gibson you will like Snow Crash.

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G-Man
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Timothy, by cosmic coincidence I was planning to re-read Confederacy of Dunces (a book about Cape Town politics) during my leave. But I didn't.

A towering book, though. Could they ever film it, or is it a Bonfire of the Vanities sort of book? Unfilmable.

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Gangster Octopus
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I can't see why it'd be unfilmable, except it probably couldn't be done with US money, as there's no nice or cute characters.

I've now started on The Trial. A barrel of laughs.

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GIK
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Finished Frank Skinner's autobiography, funny, liked it. Not a novel I know.

Am now reading the horrible but engrossing '69 things to do with a dead princess' by Stewart Home.

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garcia en dolor
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i started on 'the human stain' by philip roth, pretty good so far. in japan i read a last-minute airport buy, 'killing pablo' by the guy who wrote black hawk down. an interesting story although the guy isn't much of a writer. he puts in a lot of annoying moments like "the american cracked open a beer and settled down in the armchair in his hotel room to read the escobar file ... muffled explosions thudded through the bogota night ... this was going to be fun". also his view of the integrity of the us security forces seems pretty optimistic.

this is particularly annoying towards the end. it talks about this DEA man joe toft, can't remember his exact position. at the end he resigns in righteous disgust because even though they've killed pablo and crushed the medellin ring 'the good guys have not won'. firstly he claimed to have been 'sickened' at the manner in which pablo was eventually brought down.

what happened was that an american/colombian/cali cartel-funded vigilante death squad called los pepes slaughtered all escobar's relatives, friends and associates. this terrorised his network of informants, destroyed his organisation and weakened his defences to the point at which even the colombian police would be able to catch and kill him. this was the only way to do it - legal prosecution was impossible because pablo would buy or kill any trial judge. remember that escobar killed thousands of people, almost destroyed the colombian state, and got america hooked on crack. toft's supposed humanitarian discomfort with the illegal methods used to destroy escobar looks pretty hypocritical, but the writer takes it at face value.

toft's second complaint was that destroying pablo's medellin cartel had only handed the country over to the cali cartel, which immediately became the richest and most powerful commodity monopoly in the world. but how could he have failed to foresee this? everyone in colombia knew the cali cartel was helping los pepes with money and hitmen - it made sense for them to destroy their chief business competitor. only an idiot or a liar would profess surprise that they were the chief beneficiaries of the destruction of the medellin ring, but again the writer gives toft the benefit of the doubt.

an interesting story, but a little too tom clancified for a whole hearted recommendation

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boris
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Due to recommendations on this very forum I read Tibor Fischer's Under the Frog. I almost didn't - after a very stodgy beginning I was considering giving up and going back to the fascinating Bass Culture, but I stuck with it and, in the end, glad that I did as it definitely picked up towards the end when the people rose up against the Soviets. However, I have to say that it in now way lived up to the hype on the cover.

I also (re)read History of the World in 10.5 chapters which, on second reading, I found to be too contrived and too obviously Julian Barnes saying "look at me" to be so enjoyable as it was first time round.

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