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» One Touch Football - Archive » World Cup » In the wake of the World Cup ... (Page 2)

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Author Topic: In the wake of the World Cup ...
Reed
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"a game that involves far less contact than Rugby League."

I think you'll find that's not actually true. It's not like our version of football started out with pads and helmets. Those were introduced to cut down on the limb dislocations, knock outs and death.

Nor is steroids likely the main reason guys die young. Not directly, anyway. The problem is that these guys are so fucking huge that it puts a massive strain on their hearts - sleep apnea, etc.

I like gridiron, but I quit after playing one proper season in seventh grade. Actually, for me, the prospect of getting beaten into the ground and probably having multiple knee surgeries by the time I was 20 wasn't the problem.

It was the combination of male warrior culture plus unrelenting tedium of practice. Games can be fun, but football practice is unbelievably tedious and not remotely fun, especially if they put you on the line. The last thing I wanted to do after school was have to study diagrams, listen to a guy yelling at me and then do the same thing over and over until we got it right. In between that, you have the older bigger kids threatening to beat you up - not for any reason, just because they're bigger than you.

Touch football with one's mates in the park is 1000x more fun than the "real" thing.

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linus
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Incadenza, Korea embraced the World Cup, then it embraced the sport along with it.

Reed, you're just as likely to have knee surgery playing competitive soccer as a teenager than playing American football, if not more. It's the concussions that are bad.

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Reed
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Linus, that's probably true. Knee problems are pretty universal to all sports except maybe golf and archery. I don't know how soccer and football compare. I didn't mean to suggest that the knee injuries were unique to football.

As a guess, I'd imagine soccer causes more strains and general wear and tear, as well as some significant tears requiring surgery, but football probably creates more catastrophic it's-hard-to-understand-how-the-bottom-part-of-his-leg-is-attached-to-the-top-part injuries.

But the combination of knee problems and having to be so big means that there are lots of guys out there - including lots who never played past high school, who have knee problems their whole life because of football. No other sport sees to create that kind of lasting damage as often, at least, at least from what I've seen.

In addition to concussions, football is also good for serious neck injuries, back injuries, shoulder dislocations and tears, and broken arms.

As you'll often hear NFL guys say, football isn't a contact sport, it's a collision sport. As such, head and shoulder injuries are the biggest danger, so they wear helmets and shoulder pads. Those two things makes all the other pads necessary, really, because a hard whack by a guy's head with a helmet it on can do a lot of damage to hips, knees, quads, ribs, etc.

Rugby people seem to think they're simply tougher, but I've watched enough rugby to see that the game does not entail whacking into one another the way football does. Rugby can have some pretty viscious tackles, but there the main impact is the guy with the ground and high tackles are illegal.

In football, you have lots of shoulder to shoulder contact as part of blocking, often coming between guys running hard into each other after a bit of a run up. There is no blocking like that in rugby. The scrum in rugby is more of a pushing contact, not so much a mutual shoulder collision.

Rugby doesn't have cut blocks either, I don't think.

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Inca
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quote:
Incadenza, Korea embraced the World Cup, then it embraced the sport along with it.
Well, that's good for Korea, but there was no upsurge in interest in MLS during the World Cup, nor in the few weeks since the end of the World Cup. MLS started in 1995, a year after the US hosted in 1994. It started with a lot of big crowds in some market, which then declined to decent numbers for some of the teams.

I was making the distinction between soccer and the World Cup--many of the viewers for the World Cup were not watching because it was soccer, but because it was spectacle, a major event, that just happened to have soccer as part of it. There are tons of people here that watch the Super Bowl, many more than watch a NFL game every week. Now, this isn't a great comparison, because football is the most popular sport in the US. But the Super Bowl isn't a football game--it's an event. So the people that watch the Super Bowl because it's a big deal are like most of those that watched the World Cup final, I think.

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linus
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Incadenza, agree, In Korea's case, nationalism was a big factor in their interest in the WC, then that transferred over to the game itself with the younger crowd.

Reed, I think knee, ankle and foot problems are worse in soccer, but everything else (head, spine, collarbone, shoulder etc) are indeed much worse in American FB.

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jason voorhees
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Gridiron knee injuries are much worse. 300 lb men throwing their shoulder-pad protected bodies into a planted knee from any direction.

Someone cue up the Lawrence Taylor-Joe Theisman clip.

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jason voorhees
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Joe Theisman - Pride of South River, NJ
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Inca
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I'm going to be nauseous, but I can't help myself from watching the clip.

It's not as famous as Theisman's injury--wasn't on Monday night, didn't have LT involved--but to me, Napoleon McCallum's injury was far more stomach-churning.

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Reed
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I have no doubt there are more ankle and knee injuries in soccer, but not as many catastrophic vomit inducing injuries, I'd suspect, as football.
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Inca
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There have been some doozies, however. There was the David Busst injury, which injured his career. Peter Schmeichel vomited when he saw it, and it took a couple of minutes to clean blood off of the pitch from the leg injury, apparently.
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and I am the life
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yeah, but in football it seems that those leg snapping injuries seem to occur randomly because of studs sticking, like cisse twice, or larsson. Even Busst just caught his studs in the ground, and didn't have a 300 lb player like Brian McClair crashing into him.
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Phoebe Disco
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There have been some doozies, however. There was the David Busst injury, which injured his career. Peter Schmeichel vomited when he saw it, and it took a couple of minutes to clean blood off of the pitch from the leg injury, apparently.

Schmeiecel needed counselling, and Busst needed skin grafts. It's a very big, and not at all pretty scar.

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Janik
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Course, as Reed alludes to, the Helmets and other protection in American Football end up being used as offensive weapons rather than as the protective equipment they were meant as. The top of someones skull crashing into your ribcage isn't nice, but he is likely to hit far harder if it's cushioned by foam padding and fibre-glass...

Rugby, (both codes), now allows some limited amounts of body-armour. With predicatable results. A reduction in some injuries, but an overall increase as hits come in harder with the tacklers more confident that their own body can take it due to the protection. For this in microcosm, see the 'career' of Jonny Wilkinson.


And clearly there is far more contact in American Football than there is in Rugby. In one sport is actively illegal to make contact with someone who doesn't have the ball. In the other it's a fundamental part of the stratergy of the game.

As Reed said;
In football, you have lots of shoulder to shoulder contact as part of blocking, often coming between guys running hard into each other after a bit of a run up. There is no blocking like that in rugby.
Though the idea that there is no blocking like this in Rugby might come as news to the coaches of Southern Hemisphere sides...

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Exploding Vole, The
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I was pen-pals with Dave Busst's father for a number of years (when Dave was still a kid).

Just thought I'd mention that.

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Hieronymus Bosch
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those leg snapping injuries seem to occur randomly because of studs sticking, like cisse twice, or larsson.

Larsson's was more of a nasty collision with Serge Blanc of Olympique Lyonnais.

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