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» One Touch Football - Archive » Football » New WSC - Game 39 cover (Page 2)

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Author Topic: New WSC - Game 39 cover
You Are The Ref
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Yeah, I don't fancy their chances in a packed Stadio Del Mar against Atletico Zamora, 'The offside kings of Europe'.
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noj
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The american letter is awesome.
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Selwyn Rice
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And not one but two mentions of Donovan in the same issue. Like buses, they are.
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blackdogbeak
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Remember: if you don't want to pay for your WSC, Joshua Brookes (a bar in Manchester) have a copy in their magazine rack you can easily swipe. They even have the current issue already.

I, of course, bought my copy last week anyway.

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Joe Public
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Actually, and rather belatedly, I'd like to take issue with wingco and his assertion in his 'Screen Test' article that the 'Goal' documentary film "faithfully reflects what a poor World Cup 1966 was".

I don't remember it like that at all. Several sides (Portugal, Hungary, West Germany) brought sides at the top of their games playing wonderfully skilful attacking football. This more than compensated for the poor showing of the eagerly anticipated Brazilians.

North Korea also added a dimension of bravery and positivity that was infectious.

Both semi-finals and the final itself were fine games, with England finally coming out of their 'wingless wonder' shells to provide some real entertainment.

Curiously even Glanville is rather complementary about the tournament in his 'Story Of The World Cup', referring to it as a "passionate and controversial World Cup" and consistently finding more positives than negatives. Clearly he's had a bit of a change of mind somewhere along the line.

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TonTon
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Has anyone said "what the fuck is that idiot on about in the Wimbledon honours piece" yet?
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Taylor
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I love "Goal!" - it's got that gorgeous Pathe colour feel to it, the narration is well-written without being pretentious (the 1974 World Cup film goes a little overboard in that respect), and there are some fantastic shots of the insides of grounds in the 60s which bear no relation to modern football whatsoever. It's a lovely period piece, and by far the best of the official FIFA World Cup films.

Seem to remember writing a long post in a thread about those films, a few years ago. The really early ones are barely watchable (most of the football is filmed from a static camera on the halfway line, and they miss loads of goals), the later ones are horrific Rick Wakeman-scored straight-to-video stuff, though worth watching for the action (which is by now well-filmed and comprehensive), but there was that middle period from 66 to 78 where they tried to make proper films that had some artistic merit. The 1970 one has a nauseating plot involving a cutesy kid, like one of Disney's live action horrors, but is authentically lush; 1974 has a hilarious commentary from Joss Ackland and some really atmospheric footage. I like 'em.

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Hieronymus Bosch
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The 1970 one has a nauseating plot involving a cutesy kid,

Oh jesus, I remember that, he's a little blond munchkin aged about six who looks about as Mexican as the Milky Bar Kid, and he keeps turning up at each game, sitting in the stands on his own. I kept thinking a paedophile was going to wander into shot and whisk him away.

I like the 1982 one despite Wakeman's awful music. It got a PG cert because it contains a brief shot of some senorita getting her breasts out on a beach.

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Taylor
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Yeah, he runs away from home to watch the World Cup, and hitches to Mexico City. He's picked up by a rather sleazy couple in an open-topped sports car - a guy who's like a cross between George Martin and Hunter S Thompson, and his suspiciously young and foxy wife. After days have passed, we see his mother calmly ironing, watching the telly, when suddenly the camera settles on his tiny form and she realises where the fuck her son has been for the last week, and suddenly starts to give a toss.

It's also really Americanised; not sure whether that was an attempt to shift the film in the States, where it might have been the supporting feature to some cartoon or something, or just the way people made films in those days. Really stands out though, as all the others are obviously intended for football fans only, and tend to be quite serious in tone (to the point of absurdity in the 80s ones - Michael Caine or Sean Connery intoning portentously over slow-motion footage of Claudio Gentile kicking someone up the arse).

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Joe Public
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quote:
Michael Caine or Sean Connery intoning portentously over slow-motion footage of Claudio Gentile kicking someone up the arse
That's lovely, Taylor.
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TonTon
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I guess not. Well let me be the first then. How on earth does that chap get articles published when he just makes things up? Wimbledon fans stood in council elections on a football ticket? When?
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Amor de Cosmos
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Goal was heavily influenced by Kon Ichikawa's Tokyo Olympiad which was released in 1965 and a genuine breakthrough in sports documentaries. Goal uses sound in a similar way, long-lens close-ups and mid-shots, cut-aways of athletes when they are not in action and so on. It's a long time since I saw either of them but, at the time, Ichikawa's film was, quite rightly, heavily praised and duly beribboned, but Goal widely criticised for being derivative. I'd like to see them both again, time might have been kinder to Goal.

[ 19.03.2008, 20:57: Message edited by: Amor de Cosmos ]

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Reed
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"authentically lush"

I have not idea what that means in this context.

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Don Malhumorado
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Who wrote the article, TonTon?
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TonTon
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Robert Jeffrey. He's had Wimbledon stuff published before.
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