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» One Touch Football - Archive » Music » Right Wing Rock (Page 4)

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Author Topic: Right Wing Rock
Taylor
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Rogin - I'm not sure what happened "the other fucking night", but you do have a point. To be fair, though - I'm anything but a Lennon apologist, but he was involved with the New Left, Tariq Ali IMG types in London by 1968, long before he left the country (this was in the wake of "Red Mole" savaging "Revolution", and Lennon's attempts to engage with the debate).

SR - yep. Will have to be the last track, because nothing could follow that.

[ 20.02.2007, 19:11: Message edited by: Taylor ]

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Spearmint Rhino
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Ah excellent. In which case I've gone back and edited, to remove the spoiler.
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Robin Carmody
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I'm not surprised that Taylor isn't counting sexist songs. It would be problematic to many people here to count songs by black artists (which an awful lot of the most sexist songs are) as right-wing.

The thing about the Manics is that they have a strong *conservative socialist* element, a kind of quasi-Little Englanderism by other means (I remember Nicky Wire viciously attacking Spearmint for wearing the clothing of some US ice hockey team, and "Elvis Impersonator: Blackpool Pier" is possibly the only pop/rock song which could be described as genuinely *Blatchfordian*). Morrissey as well, of course (indeed, "Panic" is the only other song that might merit such a description: it's Hoggartist, at the very least).

Conservative socialist songs:

MSP - "Archives of Pain", "Elvis Impersonator: Blackpool Pier",

The Smiths - "Panic"

Morrissey solo - "Glamorous Glue", "We'll Let You Know" (the songs which are not so much about British culture generally and simply contain what some see as racist connotations are in a different territory, I think)

Then there are songs that are of the Right but not literally conservative, c.f. the subtext in a lot of Stock Aitken Waterman stuff, and High Thatcher pop generally.

In terms of revolt-into-landed-elite-values, you can't beat the self-conscious overt luxury of Roxy Music's "Avalon", as alluded to by Taylor recently - but you really do need the video for the full context.

I've often wondered (c.f. that other thread, again) whether McCartney, who I've always believed to be as close to a genuine socialist as someone so rooted in Americana can get, would have simply prevented the Beatles from ever existing had he known what their influence would be used as an excuse for by the New Right (and also whether he deliberately put the archaism "I know not when" in Peter and Gordon's "A World Without Love" because it fitted with his idea of how people from public schools, even those his own age, spoke).

And, yes, Jonathan King recorded "I Can't Let Maggie Go". He rush-released it after she did.

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Hieronymus Bosch
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Sgt Barry Sadler -- 'The Ballad Of The Green Berets'
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Spearmint Rhino
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quote:
I remember Nicky Wire viciously attacking Spearmint for wearing the clothing of some US ice hockey team
Erm, excuse me, "viciously attacking"? It was "taking the piss with a smile on his face", actually. I ought to know. I was in the room.

I also think you're reading something into "Elvis Impersonator: Blackpool Pier" which simply isn't there, but since I don't quite understand your point, I'm not sure what.

Also, "Panic"? It was a direct protest against the cheery vacuity of daytime radio DJs when the world seemed to be on the brink of nuclear meltdown.

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Taylor
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Sgt. Sadler, already present and correct SIR.
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Hieronymus Bosch
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Weird, I did a word-search for "berets" on both pages to make sure before posting, but nothing came up.
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Robin Carmody
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Sorry and all that. No doubt I misrembered the interview entirely. I usually do.

"Elvis Impersonator: Blackpool Pier" strikes me as a wistful attack on Americanisation (wasn't it accompanied with a quotation to the effect that "all countries should develop at their own social, economic, cultural and natural paces"?). Firmly in the puritan socialist tradition (actually more so than anything by the Style Council, who were forever being accused of such affiliations by Melody Maker in the 1980s in a way the Manics weirdly never were).

"Panic" was indeed concerned with daytime Radio 1 (*not* club DJs as many wrongly thought and think; the black artists Morrissey attacked at that time *by name* were invariably the ones Bates, Davies, Wright et al played), but I can sense something else in it: a yearning for an earlier, more "natural" order (but crucially also dismissing the ruralism that such things are usually associated with, because without it Morrissey wouldn't have a past just as without the dying socialist tradition he wouldn't have a future, c.f. that Grasmere reference, which I've always taken as an attack on the retrospective influence of the Romantic poets), an attack on commercialism and consumerism which is both conservative and socialist. No contradiction.

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Robin Carmody
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"Panic" is also anti-escapist ("it says nothing to me about my life" *as though that's always a bad thing*) in a way which could be seen as small-c conservative: everyone should be reminded of the difficulties of their own lives, never detach themselves from the struggle (to me, it is an openly socialist song, for all that the Smiths were never an openly socialist band). Firmly in the fun-hating vein that Spearmint identified, just in a Hoggartist tradition rather than a Leavisite one.

Fucking incredible, brilliant song though.

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Spearmint Rhino
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Still, I think of all the Smiths songs that you could have chosen (and there are many), "Panic" isn't the one.

Fair points about "Elvis Impersonator", but I think to some extent that quote was the Manics post-rationalising what Richey had written, which might just as easily have been intended as a self-loathing examination of the tawdry fakeness involved in being a rock performer, or simply the banal observation that Elvis impersonators are a bit, you know, saaad.

I'm guessing you mean Simon Hoggart because I can't think of anyone else with that name, but who is Blatchford?

Edit - oh, and while you're at it, who is Leavis?

[ 20.02.2007, 19:36: Message edited by: Spearmint Rhino ]

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Super Sharp Shooter
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quote:
"Panic" is also anti-escapist ("it says nothing to me about my life" *as though that's always a bad thing*) in a way which could be seen as small-c conservative: everyone should be reminded of the difficulties of their own lives, never detach themselves from the struggle (to me, it is an openly socialist song, for all that the Smiths were never an openly socialist band). Firmly in the fun-hating vein that Spearmint identified, just in a Hoggartist tradition rather than a Leavisite one.
I really can't see that. Maybe I'm reading more into that line than is really there, but I never got the impression that Morrisey, 60s girl group escapism devotee that he is, wanted music to be documentary-like. I rather think that "it says nothing to me about my life" means nothing more or less than there's no emotional connection there; simply that this is soulless music.

[ 20.02.2007, 19:44: Message edited by: Super Sharp Shooter ]

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Amor de Cosmos
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BTO's Takin' Care of Business is pretty Right On economically speaking.

Sandy Posey's Born a Woman is a wonderfully masochistic piece of pre-feminism.

I assume you've already included Merle Haggard's classic Okie from Muskogee?

[ 20.02.2007, 20:11: Message edited by: Amor de Cosmos ]

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My name is Mumpo
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the lack of a mention of so obvious a candidate for inclusion makes me think i might be missing the point, but no-one's ventured Mick's 'Let's Work'.
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Fitter Happier
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The Holy Bible reminds me of Plath and Sarah Kane in a way: as if Edwards was trying to write out of himself all the things he didn't necessarily like about himself, but all the things that made him him. I listened to it for the first time in ages the other day and it really astounded me. Not least because it comes from a man, and I can't think of another male making such bleakly personal, desperate statements (Ian Curtis, who could also be a candidate for right-wing lyrics, is more metaphoric).

Aside from songs mentioned, 'Of Walking Abortion' isn't traditionally right wing but certainly references some pretty abhorrent (though incredibly interesting) politics (the SCUM Manifesto, which urged women to murder men and create an all-female society).

Skrewdriver, anyone?

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Robin Carmody
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Especially because he was the *true* Godfather of Thatcherism (not discounting Keith Joseph's claims here, but ...). (xpost: this was a response to Major Eazy's mention of Jagger's "Let's Work")

Which Smiths songs would you regard as the most literal-conservative / anti-escapist, Spearmint?

"Hoggart" is Richard Hoggart, Simon's father and immensely important Old Left thinker of the (broadly) anti-pop-culture variety: "The Uses of Literacy" (1957) was immensely important on the Left from then until the forced changes of Wilson/Beatlemania, and its influence could be seen by some as a factor in Labour's massive 1959 defeat, although it was probably more the simple fact that times of rising prosperity after long years of austerity will always create a public desire for more of the same politically. Blatchford is Robert Blatchford, a moralistic early socialist who in his later life supported the Tories and expressed admiration for Stanley Baldwin. Leavis is F.R. Leavis, a broadly prescriptivist literary critic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Hoggart

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Blatchford

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F.R._Leavis

Here's a neo-feudalist right-wing attempt to claim Blatchford: http://www.freedompartyuk.net/public/standardbearers/blatch.html

[ 20.02.2007, 20:33: Message edited by: Robin Carmody ]

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