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Author Topic: Perfect classical
smallweed
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Beethoven's violin concerto
R Strauss Four Last Songs
second act of Tristan & Isolde

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Croute au fromage et oeuf au plat
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Chopin's "Nocturnes", wonderful piano fugues galore.
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ian .64
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Copland - Appalachian Spring.
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Andy C
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I'm trying to think of things that are not just incredibly powerful (in various ways - there's a power in quiet simplicity just as there is in the overwhelming blast) but - as Wyatt identified in the opening post - couldn't be any other way without being diminished. And I think Wyatt was very much on the right lines with the St Matthew passion. Bach's very much the man for this - there's an inevitability about his greatest works which transcends the formulaic. There are surprises and unexpected turns all at the same time as the music feels just right.

If I were to nominate just one example of his work that has this quality in suberabundance it'd be the 'cello suites.

A number of posters have been a bit sheepish about nominating familiar pieces, but there're really no need - often (not always, I'll grant), a piece is well known because of its merits. So I'll add a few to the list, popular, some of them, but nevertheless utterly masterful, completely achieving everything the composer intended and more. And for which it's impossible to imagine any alteration being an improvement.

Satie Gymnopédies
Vaughan Williams Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis
Beethoven Symphony No. 9; the Late String Quartets
Fauré Requiem
Tippett Concerto for Double String Orchestra

[edit: spelling "improvement" properly would be an improvement]

[ 18.03.2008, 13:48: Message edited by: Andy C ]

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ian .64
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Speaking of VW: Lark Ascending.
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wingco
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Seconded for the Vaughan Williams/Thomas Tallis, Andy. And the Requiem. Ooh, and the late String Quartets, And the Satie. I'd like to be able to say the Tippett concerto is a load of shite, just so as not to seem like a kiss ass, but I haven't heard it.

Also

Bartok: Music for strings, percussion & Celesta (and his string quartets, esp 3 &4)
Pierre Schaeffer: Orphee
Stockhausen: Kontakte/Hymnen
Boulez: Le Marteau Sans Maitre
James Galway: Annie's Song (it would be remiss not to include one of our up and coming young flautists)

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Andy C
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Tragically, I think you'd love the Tippett, wingco. I'll make you a copy - PM me if you'd like me to post it or you can wait until our paths cross once again.

And I'll second the Bartok (I've got the Emerson Quartet playing the complete quartets somewhere, and I'll certainly be digging that out when I get home - thanks for the prompting), Stockhausen and Boulez. I don't know the Schaeffer.

There was nothing on here when Stockhausen died, was there? I was out of the country when it happened and I only heard the news about six weeks ago.

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Joe Public
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Yes, there was a thread about Stockhausen I'm sure.
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Andy C
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So there was. How on earth did I miss that?
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statto99
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IMHO Beethoven's Violin Concerto would be the top of this particular pile with honourable mentions going to:

Lots more Beethoven, but especially the 5th Symphony
Strauss - Blue Danube
Wagner - Overture to Tannhauser
Piazzolla - Fuga y Misterio
Sibelius - Andante Festivo
Bach - Prelude and Fugue in C Major, BWV 846
Borodin - String Quartet no. 2 in D major
Ysaye - Violin Sonatas

[ 21.03.2008, 21:20: Message edited by: statto99 ]

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statto99
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By the way, Classic FM have just finished day one of their annual four day Easter countdown through their listeners' favourite 300 pieces. They start again at 9am Saturday morning and go through to Monday night. Definitely worth dipping into.
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statto99
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And here's this year's Classic FM listener top 10:

1 (1) Vaughan Williams: The Lark Ascending
2 (3) Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 2
3 (10) Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
4 (5) Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 5 'Emperor'
5 (8) Beethoven:Symphony No. 6 'Pastoral'
6 (4) Mozart: Clarinet Concerto
7 (2) Elgar: Cello Concerto
8 (7) Bruch: Violin Concerto No. 1
9 (6) Elgar: Enigma Variations
10 (9) Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 'Choral'

http://www.classicfm.co.uk/sectional.asp?id=9443

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Alania Vladikavkaz Satie
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Im a Satie man myself like.
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