This board has been transferred to www.wsc.co.uk,

    why not join us there

One Touch Football - Archive   
my profile | directory login | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» One Touch Football - Archive » World » Anthony Bourdain on the Food Network (Page 2)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 5 pages: 1  2  3  4  5   
Author Topic: Anthony Bourdain on the Food Network
Wyatt Earp
Member
Member # 108

 - posted      Profile for Wyatt Earp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
That seems to be her Limey namesake.
Posts: 19927 | From: the Cryptic Cabal | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Croute au fromage et oeuf au plat
Member
Member # 19

 - posted      Profile for Croute au fromage et oeuf au plat     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Well her recipe probably speaks a lot more to most people in the USA (and, adapted, in the UK)than anything more "authentic".

Very few people are bothered about sourcing fresh, local ingredients from small shops.

Posts: 16714 | From: Outskirts of Manchester | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wyatt Earp
Member
Member # 108

 - posted      Profile for Wyatt Earp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
Very few people are bothered about sourcing fresh, local ingredients from small shops.
Sure. But it's not a toss-up between "Let's go the farmers' market and see what's fresh" and "You expect me to slice a mushroom?"
Posts: 19927 | From: the Cryptic Cabal | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lardinho
Member
Member # 1208

 - posted      Profile for Lardinho     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
AHahahahahaha! I've just seen her recipe for macaroni cheese. The ingedients are:


1 package (7 1⁄4-ounce) macaroni and cheese mix, Kraft®
1 tablespoon Mexican seasoning, McCormick®
3/4 cup shredded Mexican cheese blend, Kraft®

Posts: 4013 | From: London | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Croute au fromage et oeuf au plat
Member
Member # 19

 - posted      Profile for Croute au fromage et oeuf au plat     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
She is like that chef in the second Gremlins movie innit?
Posts: 16714 | From: Outskirts of Manchester | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WornOldMotorbike
Member
Member # 1569

 - posted      Profile for WornOldMotorbike     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I like picturing Nigella Lawson naked, lying on top of her great big stinking pile of money.
Posts: 3858 | From: the head office of One Man's Opinion Corp. | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Inca
Member
Member # 675

 - posted      Profile for Inca     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
Well her recipe probably speaks a lot more to most people in the USA (and, adapted, in the UK)than anything more "authentic".

Very few people are bothered about sourcing fresh, local ingredients from small shops.

But that's where Food Network could really make a difference if they wanted. They could make shows that talk about the importance of farmers markets and local ingredients. For most Americans, there aren't small local shops selling produce. There might be a farmers market, though. But they could get people thinking about why having these options are important. But then they'd probably start thinking about why they only have Wal-Mart Supercenters and giant supermarkets where the produce tastes like nothing...and that could be dangerous for their sponsors.

[ 14.02.2007, 16:48: Message edited by: Inca ]

Posts: 16877 | From: Gobias Industries | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tubby Isaacs
Member
Member # 223

 - posted      Profile for Tubby Isaacs     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Wyatt was being sarcastic about that spag bol?
Posts: 18279 | From: Georgica | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ursus arctos
Member
Member # 1452

 - posted      Profile for ursus arctos     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I don't really want to defend these people, because there are elements of what they do that are indefensible, but I do think that it is important to understand their target audience.

It certainly isn't foodies.

It isn't even people who already cook on a regular basis.

It is, however, the very large number of Americans who cook either rarely or not at all and feed themselves from fast food places, "salad bars" (that have evolved into steam tray emporia featuring dozens of overcooked and underflavored "entrees") and the seemingly endless variety of frozen dishes one can get in any American supermarket.

From my perspective, if shows like this can get any of these people to actually use their kitchens to make something, that is a good thing. And I am sure that some of them will actually think (gee, you know I can buy the loose mushrooms and slice them myself for half the price of the sliced ones . . )

Posts: 18670 | From: mediolanum | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Inca
Member
Member # 675

 - posted      Profile for Inca     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Oh, absolutely. Even the FN's biggest detractors will say that the average American palate has gotten more adventurous and expecting new things thanks to the hegemony of the FN.

When I was growing up, a salad to me and my parents was iceberg lettuce, prepackaged croutons, and a lot of ranch dressing. Even living close to Los Angeles, that was pretty much the standard of food in restaurants where we lived, and anything better than that was seen as snooty and pretentious. I don't doubt that the FN is a big reasons that I eat better food now (my parents too). And you can find a bigger variety of ingredients in even the biggest supermarket. It used to be impossible to find arugula.

But I'm just saying that they could really do a lot more to educate Americans about food. I just wish that Michael Pollan had 1/100th the influence that Rachael Ray does.

[ 14.02.2007, 17:03: Message edited by: Inca ]

Posts: 16877 | From: Gobias Industries | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TonTon
Member
Member # 41

 - posted      Profile for TonTon     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Those aren't recipes, are they? I mean, they aren't. Even I know that, and I'm no cook.
Posts: 9771 | From: London. Yes, actual London, with a real London postcode and everything. | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lardinho
Member
Member # 1208

 - posted      Profile for Lardinho     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I seriously don't think that "take a packet of kraft macaroni cheese, and add some brocolli florets" counts in any way as "cooking" or does anything beneficial for the US palate.

Also, if Inca's point is correct, this reinforces the hegemony of the "Walmart" giant shop full of flavourless food, leaving even less capacity (and even less demand) for smaller independent farmers market, say.

If Ursus is right that America needs FN to encourage people to even boil some pasta to go with their choc-chip pancakes wrapping sausages, then it also needs, in addition, more serious foody shows such as the hated Jamie Oliver in the UK, where people say "You can make this fantastic meal: go and buy some really really top quality meat from your local organic butcher in the market, and then don't cook it very long".

It's simple and trite advice, but people want the food and know even they can cook it provided they can buy the meat. The few farmers markets will get more custom, and it propogates through.

Posts: 4013 | From: London | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Inca
Member
Member # 675

 - posted      Profile for Inca     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
"You can make this fantastic meal: go and buy some really really top quality meat from your local organic butcher in the market, and then don't cook it very long".
But that's the problem--this option isn't available to everyone.

Just here in Southern California, you can see the difference. The best farmers market is in Santa Monica, a rather wealthy city. Mrs. Inca and I will drive 20 miles there and back because it's on the weekend when we can get to it (there are a few farmers markets closer to us, but they're during the week), but also because it's better than what we can get near us. We have some decent markets (Trader Joe's is good and affordable, Bristol Farms has really good stuff but is outrageously expensive).

But in poorer neighborhoods, there still really aren't markets nearby. I'll repeat that--there aren't supermarkets in the 'hood. There are plenty of liquor stores and fast food places, but not really any markets. Certainly not a Trader Joe's, Bristol Farms, or a Whole Foods. The markets that are there are Food 4 Less. The socioeconomic target demographic is right there in the name--"this is for you poor folks." And Food 4 Less is pretty grim inside, not stocked well, and no real good produce.

Posts: 16877 | From: Gobias Industries | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ursus arctos
Member
Member # 1452

 - posted      Profile for ursus arctos     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
And Inca is in California.

The overall situation is much worse in "flyover land".

Posts: 18670 | From: mediolanum | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lardinho
Member
Member # 1208

 - posted      Profile for Lardinho     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
But the only way that proper markets are ever going to grow, the only way you'll get more of them, is if there's a demand. When Jamie Oliver first appeared on telly, trotting off to Borough Market to buy his £20 pork chops, it was just about the only decent sized farmers market in Britain. But people saw him and wanted to get as close as possible in their neighbourhood. There were the equivalent of you driving to Santa Monica. The result isn't perfect - we're still dominated by Tesco - but I have a feeling that we have far more market stalls selling decent quality produce than we used to have a decade ago; and the small local butcher and so on are making a bit of a come back.

The presence of Sandra Lee saying "Cook with a packet of Kraft macaroni cheese" is not going to help anything. The presence of Jamie Oliver saying "Buy a really high quality piece of sirloin and some really fresh ripe plum tomatoes. Chop the tomatoes, add some basil and olive oil, and a tiny bit of balsamic vinegar to make a salad, eat this with the sirloin that you cook for 30 seconds each side" really encourages people, because that means they know they can have a great meal in about 10 minutes.

Posts: 4013 | From: London | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 5 pages: 1  2  3  4  5   

   Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | WSC

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2

    This board has been transferred to www.wsc.co.uk,

    why not join us there