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» One Touch Football - Archive » World » Anthony Bourdain on the Food Network (Page 5)

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Author Topic: Anthony Bourdain on the Food Network
Reed
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Keeping the lobster as a slave was the real cruelty. Overfeeding it, it would seem, would just be gravy.
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Inca
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quote:
My personal belief, although I can't prove this, is that a lot of the exotic cuisine that we hear about or see on that show - various sorts of bugs, deep fried rats, ground sand-crab curry, etc, is only eaten because the people in those places can't afford not to. If they could get their hands on proper meat, they wouldn't be eating bugs.
Some American restaurants now are serving insects, arguing that they're high in protein, and use up far less energy and create less waste than livestock or poultry in how they are raised.

Some regions of Mexico eat fried insects. I'd try a fried grasshopper. I figure if it's been fried and seasoned, it would be more tolerable to me--certainly not something like eating grubs.

But to go back to what you said about stinky tofu, some Mexicans also really like huitlacoche, or corn smut (a literal translation is "raven's excrement", because that's what it looks like). You can buy it in cans. That's too much for me.

quote:
For example, I imagine the first crab or lobster consumed by a human was done so on a dare.
Just like I wonder what compelled someone to try cheese or yogurt for the first time. "Well, this *used* to be milk...let's give it a try!"
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Reed
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When there was no meat, we ate fowl and when there was no fowl, we ate crawdad and when there was no crawdad to be found, we ate sand.

You ate what?

We ate sand.


You ate SAND?

That's right!

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Gangster Octopus
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quote:
Some American restaurants now are serving insects
As long as they pay the bill...
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ursus arctos
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and leave a decent tip, of course . . .
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Inca
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And as long as they don't bug the other patrons.
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Wyatt Earp
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quote:
Of course, every now and then a "peasant dish" created out of necessity either turns out to be very good.
to be fair, I think it's more than "every now and then". Many of the very best dishes in the world began like that. Just about every preserved food for example. So that's ham, bacon, smoked salmon, kippers, salt beef, bacalao, etc etc. Plus, as you say, slow-cooked stews (and what's nicer than them?). They've done us proud, the world's peasants.
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Reed
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I didn't mean it that way.

There are certainly tons of examples, but I imagine that even that long list probably represents just a small portion of the things that have been tried.

The possibility of doing actual food science is fairly recent, so I can only assume that the good stuff came about through lots of trial and error.

We don't know about all the awful things that humans have eaten over the years but didn't bother to pass down to their ancestors because they were awful or poisonous or both.

And of course, there are lots of food items that have persisted and are sometimes even celebrated, despite being completely revolting. Lutefisk, the aforementioned rotten tofu, black olives, etc.

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Wyatt Earp
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Black olives?
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Croute au fromage et oeuf au plat
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Black olives? It's one thing mentionning odd foodstuff like that fermented soya bean stuff the Japanese love but olives are just fruit and their taste is not revolting in that sense...

I have found a list of recipes from the area my mother is from in Italy, proper alpine peasant stuff, dating back to at least a century and there is very little difference. The only recipe which has fallen out of favour is a kind of stew of small birds (starlings and the likes) and that's probably because chicken is a lot easier to find (many houses in the villages have a few chicken in the garden nowadays).

I also watched a long time ago a show on French TV about medieval cooking and most recipes were surprisingly "normal" although back then, the posher you were, the more spices you used and they were used in a rather odd way. That's why some people in canton Vaud thought it would be a fashionable idea to put cumin seeds in their Brie like cheese...

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ad hoc
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The word Reed was clearly looking for to complete that list was actually "cheese".
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Reed
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Black olives are awful. Green olives are pretty nasty too. I appear to be the only one who has noticed.

[ 09.03.2008, 17:42: Message edited by: Reed ]

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The Batebe of Toro Foundation
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Sort your spellchecker out, Reed, look at how it's mangled "awesome" and "tasty".

[ 09.03.2008, 17:44: Message edited by: The peak of El Toro-quino ]

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Reed
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Blegggh.
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Inca
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quote:
Apparently Anthony Bourdain has caused a shitstorm in Romania by making a show which was, how can I put this, highly critical of the country. No idea if anyone here has seen it, but it seems from reading his blog that he (a) went with a Russian guide who knew fuck all about the place; (b) got really bad service; and (c) thought the food wasn't up to much.
Finally watched this episode last night, and I honestly can't see why Romanians should be pissed off. If anything, he and his friend came off bad in the episode because they didn't know much about the place. The only negative thing about the place in the episode was when they tried to film a statue of Vlad the Impaler in Bucharest and were refused, even though they had a permit. The guards told them that they could let them in if they wanted to pay 10 Euros per square meter of the site that they wished to film at.

[ 25.03.2008, 16:01: Message edited by: Inca ]

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