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» One Touch Football - Archive » World » What art has impressed you lately? (Page 32)

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Author Topic: What art has impressed you lately?
Tubby Isaacs
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I was a bit harsh on that mural, I reckon. It is a bit static though. But the history makes it worth looking at really, and its location. You certainly find some interesting places to get lost in, Leo.

Ursus, thanks for the public art collection advice. De Menil looks great in Houston. Now, pardon my ignorance but the plan will be a flight to one city (in the east) on route to Houston, then a flight on from there. Can I combine a couple of cities easily in this stopover, and how much time needed?

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Tubby Isaacs
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I'll also be going to Edinburgh as some point. Where I shall see this:

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Venus meets the Cyclops.

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Tubby Isaacs
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The Raphael Cartoons in the V&A deserve to be better known than they are. I imagine lots of people who see them have got lost, Leo-style, rather than having marked them down as an unmissable visitor attraction. Here is the Miraculous Draught Of Fishes:
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These are designs made by R as the basis of Flemish tapestries. It isn't just the draught that's miraculous. There's a remarkable degree of finish to the cartoons, far beyond the needs of the task, and done at a time when R was "the hardest working man in showbusiness" doing the equivalent of starring in a hollywood blockbuster while simultaneously presenting the Radio One breakfast show and opening the bowling for Gloucestershire in the county championship. Then the fact they exist at all is a miracle- they're not canvas, still less on panel, but loads of bits of paper stuck together. Most cartoons didn't survive, and these, which spent years and years in weavers' workshops, would seem to have had less chance than most.

But what a piece. Wonderful rhythm flowing through the figures, much ideal art (like the nudes) but also more natural touches like the fish, birds and the crab. In fact, the drapery is blowing about, not it seems because that's what drapery does in pictures, but because there is a wind which is subtly affecting the birds as well.

Brilliant stuff.

[ 10.02.2008, 21:28: Message edited by: Tubby Isaacs ]

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Tubby Isaacs
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One for Andy C. Eric Ravilious, Train Ride:

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What an image. I love the way the window makes it into a triptych. Interestingly, the landscape isn't a blur, like in "Rain, Speed and Steam" but static. I love too the texture of Ravilious's stuff. Despite the obvious contrasts between inside and outside the carriage, the two areas seem to have something in common too. Note the belt keeping the window tight shut as well.

A third class carriage.

[ 10.03.2008, 10:00: Message edited by: Tubby Isaacs ]

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Andy C
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Thanks, Tubby. I hadn't seen that one before.
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Amor de Cosmos
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The designer in me wants to level the top of the windows with the frame, but otherwise it's got a fascinating magic realist quality. It is about texture isn't it. Is it a watercolour?
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Ginger Yellow
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When did Jack Black do a Paul Revere film?
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Andy C
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Ravilious was himself a graphic designer - he did a bit of work for London Transport.
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Amor de Cosmos
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I know Andy, though graphic designers in the modern sense barely existed in his day, he'd be considered more of an illustrator nowadays I think. I've seen some of the London Transport stuff, his street scene/shop windows are really interesting subjects for the period, though that style of English modernism isn't altogether a favourite of mine.
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ursus arctos
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I hadn't seen this one before now and quite like it, though I share Amor's discomfort about the way the image is framed. Might the image have been cropped? The balance between the two sides is also a bit off (not that it has to be perfectly symmetrical, but the perspective is off and it seems strange to have just that hint of the headrests on the viewer's right and to treat the light effects that way (what is producing the reflection on the grill above the windows?)).

And the train buff in me is obliged to ask. Did English third class carriages of that period really have upholstered seats (and wall panels)? On the continent, they were almost always bare wood.

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Amor de Cosmos
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Yes they did. I could be be wrong but I don't think English carriages, of any class, had wooden seats since the days of The Rocket. Where's PaulS when you need him?

The large number on the inside of the door seems wrong to me but it probably isn't. The class numerals I remember were on the outside of the doors only.

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Tubby Isaacs
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The image is as it appears in my book, ursus, so probably uncropped.

It's watercolour on paper. Be nice to think it might survive as long as the paper Raphael upthread. Currently in Aberdeen Museum and Art Gallery.

I like that design/artist comparison- the implication that perhaps design is a bit neater. I'm surprised Amor and ursus are seeing themselves as designers. I like the slight slant (which I hadn't noticed until it was mentioned here) so I'm an artist.

I came across this in a rather good landscape book.

[ 10.03.2008, 22:13: Message edited by: Tubby Isaacs ]

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Amor de Cosmos
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Yeah the designer's hat can be a liability sometimes. It can interfere with your involvement in a piece and cloud perception of its more important qualities.

Ravilious's watercolour technique is interesting which is why I asked. I've only seen some some of his war-time paintings but he uses tiny little pointillist-type brushstrokes, very different from the washes most English landscape painters favour. I don't know who taught him but it reminds me quite a bit of fine porcelain painting, very curious.

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nefertiti
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Ravilious did a lot of porcelain.
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[ 10.03.2008, 22:28: Message edited by: nefertiti ]

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Amor de Cosmos
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Aha!
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