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» One Touch Football - Archive » Film » Your all-time number one film? (Page 1)

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The 7th Baron Bartok
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Let's keep this simple. Name your all time favourite film. Not your best two, or three or whatever, just one. And say why you've chosen it.

I'll start:

THE APARTMENT (Billy Wilder, 1960)

Everything about the film is just perfect. The good story, the motifs (cracked mirror etc), the warmth, the effortlessly sensitive mix of tragedy and comedy, the ticklingly good Wilder wit, the uplifting story of the hero's moral struggle and eventual sacrifice of mammon, the brilliant acting by Lemmon, Maclaine and Macmurray, the music, the subtle satire, the cuteness of Maclaine, the engaging nature of "everyman" Lemmon, the wealth of great larger-than-life secondary characters like Dr. Dreyfuss, the almost classical economy of setting, the fine direction...... Billy Wilder at his awesome best.

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ian .64
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That is a toughie of the first order. I don't have a Number One, because I've seen many films whose quality and worth are too good to rule them out as 'all-time' also rans.
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S. aureus
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Withnail and I
The fact that it is hilarious, yet still manages to be totally bitter. I have yet to get tired of re-watching it.

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G-Man
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Singin' In The Rain

It's not necessarily the movie I admire the most. But it is one movie that I can watch at any time and know I'll enjoy it. And I'll enjoy virtually every scene (except perhaps the ballet, which can go on a bit if I'm not in the mood for it).

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Pietro Paolo Virdis
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Easy for you to say. It probably never rains down there.
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Admin 8
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What a difficult question. I love the Star Wars saga, in fact there are a bunch of films which would hold joint number one spot but if anyone were to ask me what my all time solitary number one favourite film is it would have to be...

Blade Runner.

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Pietro Paolo Virdis
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You’re asking the impossible. If I must choose one only, today it would be:

Disney’s 1967 Junglebook

Great story, great setting, great animation
Great characters: Baloo, Bagheera, King Louie, Shere Khan, Kaa, Colonel Hathi, Mowgli, The vultures
Funny (King Louie, the monkey on drugs, especially
Great music: The Bare Necessities, I Wan'na Be Like You, That's What Friends Are For
(No friggin’ Elton John, Sting, Phil Collins or Bryan Adams)

I can watch it alone, I can watch it with my kids if I have any. Maybe it’s not one of those a lot of people would put in their top ten list, but I doubt anyone will say it sucks.

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erwin
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Miller's Crossing

Witty, stylish, fabulous actors, fabulous set pieces, great story.

Perfect.

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Inca
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And I'll enjoy virtually every scene (except perhaps the ballet, which can go on a bit if I'm not in the mood for it).

Agree. Thank god for Cyd Charisse's legs, for letting my mind wander.

I'm going to have to think long before answering this one.

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Matej
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This is damn near impossible as I like different movies for different reasons...

but, basing this on the one movie that if I catch it on TV I will always stop and watch it at least until commercial break, and usually end up watching the rest..

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

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Purves Grundy
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School for Scoundrels is a morality tale with villains who are never any worse than somewhat caddish and wherein women are pretty, ladylike and dressed in Dior-style New Look fashions (that were anachronisitc even at the time). Optimism triumphs. It's funny, the sun shines throughout and at the end the hero performs his coup-de-grace and gets the girl by sloughing his carefully acquired veneer of cynicism and just being a nice guy again. Then the pretty girl kisses him.

I want to climb inside this film and live there forever, happy as a romantically-minded pre-pubescent.

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Mitch
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Easy question for me: The Big Lebowski by miles. I think it's perfect. Every line in every scene seems to count.

Picking the next best is really hard though. Maybe Ghostbusters, Time Bandits, Groundhog Day or The Unforgiven.

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Oolon Colluphid LLB
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Good choice 7BB. The Apartment is probably my second favourite film of all time, but my favourite is:

A Matter of Life and Death

A film about life, the universe and everything.

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Purves Grundy
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quote:
I think it's perfect. Every line in every scene seems to count.
That's just, like, your opinion, man.
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wingco
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Greatly as I empathise with PG re School For Scoundrels - indeed, any film that features the very, very, very great Alastair Sim, I have to go for an obvious one. It sees off The Battle Of Algiers, Kind Hearts And Coronets, The Third Man, etc, etc but only by the crust of a whisker.

The Godfather II.

First, one has to get past the truism that sequels are commercially driven and spurious. The first film did arguably deal completely with Michael Corleone's arc from floppy-haired, fresh faced war hero who wants nothing to do with the Mafia and his Family to slicked back schemer and ruthless assassin. But it was a point that really had to be ratcheted in, very, very slowly.

The Godfather II is indeed a slow, remorseless film - the scenes involving Michael move at a funereal, Barracuda-like pace. Obvious example, matched by the minimal and ominous soundtrack is the procession of cars en route to Hyman Roth's suburban house.

The film's long, but very economical - dialogue like "he's small potatoes" or "you broke my heart" or "I thought there was something in it for me" or "this must all end!" is pivotal. It's a triumph/tragedy. Corleone gets everything he wants and loses everything he has. The end sequence, in which it's as if his very soul is being blown away by the dried up Autumn leaves, is undeniable. This goes way, way beyond cheap, vicarious thrills in Mafiosi activity, of which even films like Goodfellas are, to an extent, guilty. Michael Corleone is a devastatingly effective lead character because he has initially engaged us but now terrifies us - he "implicates" us in the enormity of his crimes in a way that no other anti-hero has, with the possible, recent exception of Tony Soprano.

And, of course, the film would be intolerable without the flashbacks to De Niro as the young Vito. But he's a romantic, period, Robin Hood character - possibly not a reality but a myth in the mind of Michael. A notion is posited that once there was a "good" Mafia, brave and entrepreneurial, thriving on immigrant chutzpah but now it has become fatally mired in mortal sin. The analogy with modern America is unavoidable - even if idea that is steeped in delusion from the outset.

Certainly, the film attains a dark, stark, symphonic grace and gravitas that benefits from postwar liberalism and cinematic capability (1972) but is magnificently uninfected by the corporate, compromised postmdern era of cinema exemplified by Tarantino. It represents a high watermark of cinematic maturity that seems unlikely to be emulated anytime soon. And yeah, it benefits from losing Brando and his mouthful of cottonwool.

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