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Author Topic: Re: re-reading
Andy C
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Which books have you read most often? Me, the book I keep coming back to most frequently is The Wind In The Willows, as mentioned briefly here.

I've also read a lot of Wodehouse several times, and my copies of The Third Policeman and At Swim-Two-Birds have the grubby thumprints of repeated reading all over them, too.

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Spud
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Have a bit of a problem with re-reading: I know what happens. The only exception is The Glory Game. I used to read it during the summer to get me ready for the new footy season. Of course, this was in the days when TGG was practically the only footy book you could read during the close season (or at any time).

I can't watch films more than once either.

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Tramp
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I don’t re-read that often. I usually have a few books jostling for next read pole position and it worries me that I should be discovering new gems instead of revisiting old.

I do occasionally dip back in to a book to refresh my memory about something or other, but this very rarely turns into a full re-read.

I suppose cookery books would fall in to the repeated dip category.

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Admin 8
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The Terminal Man by Michael Crichton

Good stuff, not overlong and nice for train journeys...I forget how many times i've read it, but it must be a lot judging by the spine damage.

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Andy C
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You shouldn't slouch so much on those train seats, then.
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Basil
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I read Treasure Island 3 or 4 times when I was young, and I've recently read it to my boys as a bedtime story. The 9 year old loved it, but the 8year old was less enthusiastic. Arthur Ransome's Pigeon Post is the current "Children's classic" that I'm droning through.
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ale
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With so much new literature out there and accumulating all the time I now feel guilty about even considering re-reading a dog-eared old favourite when theres all them virgin spines looking accusingly at me demanding to be broken(am I on the right site here?)
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hobbes
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I tend to find my old standbys are the Dune series (that usually keeps me going for a good month or so,) American Psycho, which worries me almost as much as it worries my friends and any Chekov plays that I have lying around the place.

I keep all my Calvin and Hobbes books in the bathroom where, over time I'm sure myself and my flatmates have probably read all of them many times over.

I find I re-read a lot of books for the same reason I re-watch a lot of films. When you read a new one it's all new and I tend to whizz thru it thinking as much about what's going to happen as what is actually happening. After a few months I'll go back through it reading it more carefully without the pressure of wanting to find out the end quickly. That way I can re-read passages that are particularly good and pick up the nuances that I probably missed the first time round.

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Peter O'Hanraha-hanrahan
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Only ‘Bravo Two Zero’ by Andy McNab. Which actually improves with every read.
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Diggedy Derek
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Art- haha.

I reread eveything. I'm can't take everything in one go, I always need to revelutate them. I've read most of my fave books 2-3 times, except Proust which I'd be a maniac to try again- took a good proportion of my early 20s to finish.

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The Purple Cow
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I guess the book I've read the most is 'Maisy Mouse Makes Ginger Bread', because the kids won't sleep until I've read it twice.

Other than that, I had to read Arkady & Boris Strugatsky's 'Definitly Maybe' three times, until I was sure i understood the gist of it.

Ditto 'Neuromancer'.

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Gordon Bennet
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As I do every two years I'm getting myself all keyed up for the big summer football tournament by rereading "All Played Out". There's a bit on page 125 that starts out raising a wry smile before becoming really poignant. Bobby Robson talks about leaving out four Arsenal players, saying that they'll be able to go along to the USA four years later. He then specifically says how David Rocastle has got time on his side.
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Count Victor Lustig
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I've read Borges' "Labyrinths" repeatedly. (huge prentension alert!) I've even read them in French - they're perfect stories to read in a language you aren't quite fluent in. Someone once said that Borges reads like he's in translation even in Spanish, so there you go.

Read The Great Gatsby and Heart of Darkness several times. Short, devastating, so much more than the sum of their parts - terrific.

Recently started reading things I had read in adolescence - Evelyn Waugh (seems much much better now, think I get more of the wit) and JG Ballard short stories (not as well written as I remembered but remarkably brilliant imagination) for example.

Apparently John Bayley read "A Dance to Music of Time" straight through every year.

And Ian Paisley reads the Bible in English and Hebrew straight through at least twice yearly.

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Caliban3
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I've just finished re-reading Memoirs of a Geisha which I absolutley love simply for its beautiful use of language. I don't think I've ever read any other book where the language is so gentle and evocative. However I'm devestated (well, maybe slightly disappointed) to hear that they're making it into a film. I know that in the future, when having a discussion about literature, I will be trying to illustrate a point about the use of language and say "Have you ever read Memoirs of a Geisha?" and all I'll ever get back is "No, I've seen the film though".

[ 30-05-2002, 10:26: Message edited by: Scalliewag ]

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imp
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I read EM Forster's A Passage To India four times at school, because we had to. After hating it the first time, I really began to love it the more we were told about its background, and the more I carefully read and 'understood' it. It was the same with Shakespeare's King Lear and my favourite Will play Troilus and Cressida. But I'm too lazy now to bother re-reading something that doesn't appeal to me first time. I was complaining last night in the pub to Reed and his mate and Titianb. how I'd speed-read Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury because it was so dull, and they said how they'd had to read it in school and you needed a guide to explain to you why it was good.

From my own experience with Forster and Shakespeare, I know they're probably telling the truth. And how I wish I had my days to waste now going to literary seminars. But I know I am never again going to pick up anything by William Faulkner as long as I live.

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