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» One Touch Football - Archive » Books » The Corrections (Page 4)

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Author Topic: The Corrections
Gas Filled Dolphin Carcass
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It's a shame that a magazine like that couldn't exist for London. Instead we have the Evening Standard ES magazine which is full of photographs of Salman Rushdie having a glass of champagne stood next to a stripper and fashion comment by that 78 year old bloke who had plastic surgery to look like Liam Gallagher but actually ended up looking like the Cheap As Chips man.
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Inca
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quote:
Inca, I have been looking at buying the DVD-Rom. How much did you pay for it, if you don't mind me asking?
It was around $100. It looks like it's now $60. There's a new collected archive edition that's on a [url]portable hard drive and attaches through a USB drive[/url] for $300. I think it's priceless having all of the issues on disc (the New Yorker isn't all on Lexis-Nexis or another database), but the interface was clumsy, slow, and there were other problems with the DVD-Roms--you couldn't save any of the files onto your computers being the biggest flaw. You can buy new DVD updates as they come out, but that's just one year on a whole disc for $20--compare that to about 15 years on one disc in the set (and at a similar price if you break it down). Plus, I've read a lot of things online that people thought that the updated discs would be sent to owners of the set at no charge--something I thought as well, based on this registration form that you were supposed to send in.

quote:
It's a shame that a magazine like that couldn't exist for London.
Besides the listings at the front of the magazine and the Talk of the Town pieces, it's really not New York-specific at all. There might be profiles or essays that are about the city or the region, but it's really a national magazine.

It's the one magazine that I have to subscribe to at all times. It's not flawless--I particularly disagreed with some of its articles after Sept. 11, especially one by Jeffrey Goldberg that tried to link Saddam Hussein with Al Qaeda and which David Remnick has never apologized for. Remnick is also one of our liberal supporters of the Iraq war--the magazine doesn't have editorials, but the first Talk of the Town piece is usually political, and it basically serves as an editorial. In those, Remnick and George Packer made the liberal case for the war, and they're still trying to justify it. But not everything can be perfect.

Posts: 16877 | From: Gobias Industries | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
garcia en dolor
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according to this interview remnick has now accepted he was wrong about the iraq war.

quote:
He came out in favour of the war in Iraq, for instance, on the grounds of concern about weapons of mass destruction, and says now that 'I was wrong about that, totally wrong, as events proved very quickly.'

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Inca
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That's good to read--thanks to my mail service I miss some issues, and there might have been something from Remnick in there.

But this from the profile has me puzzled: "Meanwhile, on another floor of the Conde Nast building, the New Yorker puts Seymour Hersh's investigations of national security on the cover". The cover is an illustration...there is no "cover story".

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garcia en dolor
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what about that little flap stapled on to the cover that flags up what's inside, maybe that's what she's talking about.
Posts: 13290 | From: murphyia | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Inca
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Ah, subscribers don't get that. Makes sense for selling it on the newsstand.
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E10Rifle
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Anyway, The Corrections: just finished it. A terrific read - it has its peaks and troughs in terms of interest and readability (agree about the Lithuania stuff, though I really liked the pharma company presentation scene), but in terms of prose style, plot and characters it was spot on. I agree with imp that it's not important for you to like the characters - they're all pretty irritating in their own ways, and yet you find yourselves rooting for them a lot of the time. Enid, the mum, ultimately is the pivotal character - the only one that truly goes through any sort of epiphany.

One of the great novels about families, and family dynamics, that's for sure.

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What's the rumpus?
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Am grateful to Carcass and other fans of the book for persuading me to force my way past the dreadful opening to the magnificence beyond.

The novel reminded me a little of Richard Ford, another American writer who tries to say the unsayable but whose angle of attack is more oblique.

There are moments in the Corrections, many moments, where Franzen's writing matches his ambition, where he drills down through emotions and impressions and lays the whole tangle out on paper.

It is at times devastating in its clarity and technically superb. But while my copy trumpeted the writer's generosity I could only find traces and that's the problem.

All three children are brilliantly described but while Denise's story is riddled with failures it is the most compelling because there is a start to her neurosis and so, hope suggests, an end.

Chip jumps off the page and you feel the force of the writer's attention on full power as he explores his pain. But pain is all that his story really has: in the end it is like looking at an X-ray.

Gary is more of an example than a character and Enid's soul feels too blackened by the end to be able to feel any revelation.

Brilliant but too damning to feel real.

[ 07.03.2008, 22:46: Message edited by: What's the rumpus? ]

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