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» One Touch Football - Archive » Books » fantasy books that can hold their own (Page 4)

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Author Topic: fantasy books that can hold their own
Mighty Mudhsuden
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Has anyone said Fighting Fantasy yet? If not, that lot. Especially "City of Thieves".
Posts: 2061 | From: Hackensack... is that all you get for your money? | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Felicity, I guess so
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China Mieville's 'New Brabuzon' novels (or the two I've read, anyway) are very interesting modern takes on what a 'fantasy' novel might be.
Ms. Felicity thinks he's reet fit, too, but hasn't bothered to read his books.

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erwin
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Just to bring the tone down a notch or two ... I had the hots for Fuchsia when I was 15.
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Crusoe
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Agreed Felicity - "Perdido Street Station" is a great chunky semi-steampunk thriller for long journeys.
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Mat Pereira
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quote:
People seem to rate Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun as good borderline fantasy/SF. I found it a bit of a struggle to be honest. I prefer his short stories, which play up the Dickian metaphysical side of things.
I really, really liked the first two parts. I thought they were audacious, head-spinning stuff, but agree with you that the resolving two bits were a bit of a chore and he didn't really do anything new in them.

The only other thing i've read by him. 'The Fifth Head of Cerebus' is similar. Brilliant opening and premise, incredibly long resolution.

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Kid Dynamite
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China Mieville is great.

He's just done a kids book called Unlundun, which displays more wit, intelligence and imagination in its first 100 pages than JK Rowling has managed in all 7 volumes of The Worst Witch Has A Sex Change.

If China Mieville counts as fantasy, then so could Jeff Noon's sci-fi fairytales. Automated Alice in particular is wonderfully addled nonsense.

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Croute au fromage et oeuf au plat
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Mieville if science-fantasy really and he is perfectly happy to be a genre writer. And he is a leftie!
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Wyatt Earp
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Blimey:

 -

They really do walk among us, it seems.

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lyra
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quote:
Just to bring the tone down a notch or two ... I had the hots for Fuchsia when I was 15.
I wanted to *be* Fuchsia when I was 15. I think one has to go through one or both of these options at that age.

I'm reviving the thread because I'm terribly excited about the new KJ Parker, The Escapement. Been looking forward to this all year. And not a single goblin or wizard. Although I for one rather like goblins and wizards.

[ 05.12.2007, 18:03: Message edited by: lyra ]

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boris
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I've just seen this thread, and haven't read all of it, so apologies if I'm repeating anything already said. Basically, I agree with Mighty Mudhsuden about the Fighting Fantasy books. Also, has anyone mentioned Jack Vance yet? His books are, without exception, superbly written fantasies that easily hold their own. The Dying Earth books are particularly brilliant, by far the best fantasy books I've ever read (and I've read a lot), and the science fiction stuff he turns out is also of the highest calibre. If there's a weakness in his oeuvre I'd have said it was the Lyonesse books, which with elves and faeries and whatnot just aren't my scene, but they're still exceptionally well written in Vance's usual flowery style. I really can't gush highly enough about his work.
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Matej
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As I've never posted on this thread before, I really should mention my favorite fantasy author: Steven Brust.

But really, you'd have to take 'hold their own' as meaning adore, mock, subvert, and openly steal from.

And, like probably most decent fantasy books, the contents are far better than his covers would suggest.

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hobbes
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quote:
China Mieville is great.
I've only read (by read, I mean struggled through like a plateful moulding brussel sprouts) Perdido Street Station. It was awful.

We did it here

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Croute au fromage et oeuf au plat
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I second what Boris says about Vance. If you want to stick to the fantasy genre, the Dying Earth cycle is in turns mesmerising, funny, absurd, entrancing, melancholy. Written in Vance usual wonderful language, it reads like a dream, even in translation.

My favourite JV is "Planet of Adventure", classic sci-fi tale of stout Earth chap being shot down in orbit of a viper nest of a planet called Tschai where 4 extra-terrestrial race plus their human minions and other human misfits do live in precarious equilibrium, it's the adventure of three human friends, two of them "locals" but also the portrait of a fascinating planet and it's hundreds of wondeful, incredible little societies and the diversity of human life.

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Posty Webber
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I would absolutely urge everyone on OTF, whether they like Fantasy or not, to start reading George RR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series. It is the greatest fantasy tale ever conceived, including anything CS Lewis, Tolkein or HPL ever did. TRUST ME!!!!

Incest, rape, regicide, fratricide, gay sex, paedophilia, and betrayal set in a fictional realm akin to Northern Europe, whereby two principal families (based on York and Lancaster) bring the world to it's knees.

Protagonists die when you least expect it.

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Posty Webber
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Oh yeah - and the author's favourite is Jack Vance.
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