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» One Touch Football - Archive » Books » Damned Utd (Page 7)

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Author Topic: Damned Utd
Femme Folle
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Never mind, I think I need sleep now. I don't know what I was thinking.

Sorry I must leave you now.

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Barndoorio
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it's 4.01 am here.

and you leaving means I can reclaim the board at least.

Have a good day.

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Peter O'Hanraha-hanrahan
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Based on his portrayal in the book, if there is a film adaptation, this is who should play Johnny Giles:

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Is he really like that? Always with a sly, witty riposte, like some sort of evil ghost or something.

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Gangster Octopus
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According to The Graun, that bloke out off of Life On Mars is going to be doing readings of this. Or something.
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E10Rifle
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Glad this thread's been rehabilitated, as I've recently finally got round to reading this. And in the main I concur with the Stroke's very informed review upthread.

Although I share some of Tubby's reservations about repetitious dialogue (some of the "up the stairs, under the stand, through the corridor" stuff was needless, though such repetition worked rather better in the more pointed monologues about " his [Revie's] desk, his office, his team" etc.

I don't really get this criticism of Tubby's though:
quote:
And I didn't get much of a sense of the period either.

Why should we get much of a sense of the period though? It's essentially a journey round the fevered insides of someone's head - it would have been forced and unconvincing to drop in references to The Sweet or the 1973 Arab-Israeli conflict.

It's a great book, and how pertinent that it's come to prominence at a time when Leeds have become more hated than at any time since that period.

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Tubby Isaacs
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I didn't think it was good enough to stand outside time, as a classic piece of psychology or tragedy or whatever. The period is something that usually brings historical novels alive, but as you say, it's better if it doesn't read like Stuart Maconie's written it.
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E10Rifle
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I don't see it as a historical novel though, particularly.
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Tubby Isaacs
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I was using the term pretty loosely, just to mean a novel set in the past. You're right that the psychology is more important. But I didn't find this that good, and when that's the case, I tend to find myself looking for something else, like a reflection of the period. Do you think Clough would have acted that way if he were a manager now? The setting is relevant in that respect, and I didn't get much sense of it.
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mafu
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I thought it was alright, but far from great. The subject matter is clearly pretty juicy and that carries it along a fair distance, but this sort of thing stands or falls on the voice and style and i wasn't completely convinced by that. I had a problem with the repetition, which started to feel to me like a rather lazy option for Peace to pursue. I think that sort of thing can work but it needs a lot of craft and i'm not sure that was in the book.
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E10Rifle
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One thing that was missing was any great in-depth talk about the intricacies of football itself - tactics, style etc - but that would be understandable if you're trying to reach out beyond an audience of just, say, WSC readers. But event then, I think it does a pretty good job of illuminating what, say, Clough's Derby and Revie's Leeds symbolised about the footballing philosophies of the day.
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Gangster Octopus
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His fucking 100th post...
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garcia en dolor
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quote:
Is he really like that? Always with a sly, witty riposte, like some sort of evil ghost or something.
no, he's generally a very nice, amiable old flat-cap wearing dude. but he can be sharp if he doesn't like you.

hector o'heochagain: "come on now gilesy, cristiano ronaldo, 22 goals from the wing would ya ever cut him a bit of slack and admit you were wrong."

giles: "you're a comedian, am i right?"

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Hieronymus Bosch
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Euro 2000 . . .

Bill O'Herlihy: "John, are you not being a little harsh on England?"

Giles: "I think I'm being quite kind to them, actually, Bill."

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ale
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''One thing that was missing was any great in-depth talk about the intricacies of football itself - tactics, style etc - but that would be understandable if you're trying to reach out beyond an audience of just, say, WSC readers''

I think Peace was starting from the premise that his audience would be familiar with the events at Leeds in 1974 and the style of Cloughs management...not necessarily contemporarily (though this in itself is a wide readership) but knowing enough about the history of football to be interested...

building in the intricacies of football would have been pointless for this particular story...not least because Clough has never been accredited with tactical nous anyway...the 2.55 pm dressing room presentation of a football and telling the players to pass it to a team mate keep it on the floor and dont argue with the ref is probably simplistic but motivation rather than tactics was his management strength..

which again in the context of Peaces story is telling...Revie had coached the players to death with footballs intricacies which Clough clearly had no truck with hence the tension...

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The cantering captain
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Fairly enjoyable book, though it goes on a bit. The whole thing comes across as an almighty blunder by the Leeds board I thought, appointing a man with a style of management that is the polar opposite of his predecessor, and then bottling it when the going gets a little bit rough.

I enjoyed some of the stories, like why he wears the green top ( effectively 'luck ? bollocks to luck, oh and fuck you don revie' ), and also the chairman locking up the bar in his office. Why don't I have a bar in my office ?

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