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» One Touch Football - Archive » Books » Mission Impossible: educate me in 6 weeks (Page 3)

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Author Topic: Mission Impossible: educate me in 6 weeks
Heston Bee
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Nothing to do with being a girl, lyra, I didn't like it at all. I probably didn't get it either.
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lyra
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Sure it isn't, I just mentioned it because Pants seemed unsure!

I'm glad you said that. I remember reading it and thinking 'but when is all the brilliant stuff going to start?' I did also blame myself for not understanding it.

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Pants
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lyra: apologies - I didn't know if you were male or female. But no apologies for dissing you about 'The Great Gatsby'! Sounds like you're possibly trying to read too much into it - it's really simple. Did you catch D'Angelo's analysis of it on The Wire? Pretty much spot on, I thought.

On Mitchell's Ghostwritten, well he's clearly a big Murakami fan, but I reckon he's pushed that novel miles further than just being a rip-off. I don't think Murakami would ever have come up with the being-with-no-body chapter: he's not a sci-fi nerd like Mitchell. I thought Number9 Dream was far more Murakami-ish, but again, just writing offbeat Japanese characters doesn't mean he's a rip-off merchant.

[ 17.03.2008, 11:53: Message edited by: Pants ]

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Wyatt Earp
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I like my Kundera on the pithy and nimble-witted side; I'd go for The Joke every time.

Vonnegut's prose style I find unbearably affected. "So it goes." Fuck off.

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Antonio Gramsci
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I'm with Pants. I'm convinced Murakami must lose something in translation because I found Mitchell's books more satisfying.

I preferred Number9 Dream to Ghostwritten, though.

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Matej
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War and Peace hell, yes.

Crime and Punishment god, no. (Except for the first few chapters ending with the murder. The rest is just tedious.)

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Loose Cannon ?
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The Blue Flower - Penelope Fitzgerald (I really like her writing, effortless, graceful and with some excellent little observations about humanity).

Atomised - Michel Houellbecq, acidic but thought provoking perspective on our society.

Quinn's Book - William Kennedy, great fun, over the top Irish American saga around the US Civil War.

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The Batebe of Toro Foundation
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The Possibility of an Island by houllebecq is far better than Atomised, I think, though Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake plays the same game immeasurably better than either...
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E10Rifle
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What all the advocates have said about The Great Gatsby. One of the great things about Scott Fitzgerald was that he could write so brilliantly, and with such depth, about shallow people (and non-shallow ones too, of course).

America absolutely bossed the 20th century, literature-wise.

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lyra
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"The Possibility of an Island by houllebecq is far better than Atomised"

I think I agree with this but oh man The Possibility... is depressing.

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Inca
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quote:
For Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse Five is essential, the rest of his stuff is very variable.
My top three Vonnegut books are Slaughterhouse-Five, Breakfast of Champions, and Cat's Cradle. They vary their positions at the top based on which one I've read most recently. I think they're all brilliant.

Not a novel, but I think Dave Eggers' A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius deserves some consideration. Like it or not, it's been a very influential book.

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Wyatt Earp
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quote:
America absolutely bossed the 20th century, literature-wise.
Oh, I think your Irish, your Czechs, your Germans and (to some extent) your Brits did OK.

Speaking of a couple of those, have we had Gunter Grass, and have we had Evelyn Waugh? The Tin Drum from Grass, and Scoop (early, short, comic) or Brideshead Revisited (late, longer, serious) from Waugh.

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ad hoc
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There are quite a few US Americans on here but it's not exactly dominated by them is it?
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ad hoc
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Oh, and ooh aah, I'd really really recommend Saramago. Fantastic writer. Any of his stuff.
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Pants
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Now I've got this mental image of ooh aah, stuck in a tiny hotel room, surrounded on all sides by huge piles of books, unable to get to the door and freaking out with Serious Literature Overload.
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